Crochet Spotlight: Edwardian Gowns, Part 3

Last month, I showcased two Edwardian style gowns from the Annie’s Attic Bridal Trousseau collection (1995). This month I have one more gown from that collection to show and then another Edwardian gown from the pattern collection that came out the following year, the Edwardian Lady Collection (1996).

Crochet Edwardian Gown for Fashion Doll, lt blue with white lace

Bridal Trousseau Collection

Crochet Edwardian Gown for Fashion Doll, lt blue with white lace-side view

Turn of the Century Afternoon Frock

This dress in shades of blue and white is definitely one of my favorites. I love the ribbed ruffle along the bottom, the ruffle neckline and especially the lace curls along the skirt.

The following year another Edwardian gown collection came out from Annie’s Attic and below is Miss October:

Crochet Edwardian Gown for Fashion Doll, aqua with black lace

Promenade Costume

Crochet Edwardian Gown for Fashion Doll, aqua with black lace

Edwardian Lady Collection

Crochet Edwardian Gown for Fashion Doll, aqua with black lace

This pattern originally called for pink thread with black accents, but I decided to go with aqua instead of pink (You may have noticed from some of my previous posts that I have a thing for aqua and black).

The major trim accent on this dress is crocheted cord. I love working with that. It’s easy to create and you can make it the exact length you need (no measuring/cutting necessary as with store-bought trim) and it also blends in well with the rest of dress beacuse it’s the same material, and it’s easy to make the ends look seamless.

I love the hat for this outfit. If you read my post about the Gone With the Wind dress with the feathers, you know how I feel about those ๐Ÿ˜€ but the hat shown here wasn’t too bad. I only needed to cut the boa once, so there wasn’t too much “debris” floating around afterward.

Many of my previous dress models have been blonds and brunettes, but I specifically chose a red haired doll to wear this outfit because I loved how her hair stands out against the aqua color.

Both of these patterns are out of print now, but you can find copies for sale on eBay and Etsy quite frequently.

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Printemps Shawl Progress

Back in May, I mentioned I was starting a new shawl project. I’m steadily working toward completion and excited to say that it’s almost done! ๐Ÿ˜€

Here is a quick snapshot of the work-in-progress:

Printtemps Shawl in progress on needles

The pattern is very easy to follow and memorize. Once I got through a couple pattern repeats, I didn’t need to look at the directions again.

I’ve spent many a beautiful morning out on the porch, just me, my needles and the ball of yarn. No paperwork, no notebooks.

I did bring a row counter, to keep track of my place in case I was interrupted or distracted by a bird, a cat, a bee–you never know who might visit when you’re outside, but otherwise, I traveled light and I loved it! ๐Ÿ˜€

The hardest part (if there is a hard part–it’s a pretty easy pattern to follow, as I said), was remembering to do the yarn overs, specially at the end of row 1 of the pattern repeat because the yarn over falls at the very end of the row repeat and it’s easy to overlook.

And yes, I did miss a few from time to time, but fortunately, you can easily remedy a missing yarn over on the return row. This video from Berroco Yarn shows you how:

A couple other tips I have for doing this pattern:

ย – Use stitch markers for the row repeats. The pattern consistently works with repeats of 10 stitches across each row, so with the markers you can quickly see if you’re missing one of those yarn overs or forgot to do the k2tog or whatever.

– Use stitch markers to mark off the edges. I did this so I would remember to do the edge stitches and not accidentally jump into the row repeat.

Here is another picture of the shawl in progress where you can see the texture of the pattern a little more closely. It’s so pretty.

Printtemps Shawl texture close up

Since May I’ve been trying to do a least one repeat of the pattern (which is 10 rows) every day. The pattern calls for 35 repeats, so I will complete it in a month. I only have a couple more repeats to go, then it’s on to the trim.

Thanks for reading. I’ll keep you posted. ๐Ÿ˜€